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Yiu Fung


3 Foo Ming Street

Established in Shanghai and brought to Hong Kong around 60 years ago, Yiu Fung specialises in Chinese snacks: pickled and preserved fruits, nuts and also dried meat products such as beef, pork and fish. Even though there are hundreds of products to choose from, their most popular products are peanut candies, tangerine peel, dried papaya, or candied ginger. During Chinese New Year, the tiny store is filled with people rushing to buy sweets for lucky candy boxes placed in the home during the festive season. Mrs Lui, whose family has been fans of the store for generations, says “I now go with my daughter to stock up every Chinese New Year but I used to go with my grandma to buy preserved plums and we’d always leave with more than what we had planned! I loved trying out samples of different snacks in jars.” The store has over 30 outposts in Hong Kong today, including in Causeway Bay.

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