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Wan Chai Fire Station


435 Hennessy Road

Wan Chai Fire Station is the oldest fire station still standing in Hong Kong. Its maroon facade and retro-style balconies distinguish it from other fire stations in the city, which have followed a standard design since 1958. In 1966, Hong Kong experienced a drought so severe that the Water Authority put a ban in place, during which fire stations had to share their water supply with the general public and would only receive water every four days until the drought ended.

Wan Chai Fire Station stands next to the Canal Road flyover on Hennessy Road. Evelyn Phoa would pass by the Wan Chai Fire Station every day on her way to school. “I couldn’t help but wonder what was happening behind those doors,” she says. The four-storey building houses offices, a canteen, dormitory for on-duty firemen, a recreation room, kitchen and bathroom, married quarters and more.

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