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Jimmy Lee


Owner, Red Pepper

“In 1967, I worked as an apprentice at an architecture office by day and then went to night school. I worked on the first floor of the Lee Garden building when there were a lot of government offices but after three years, realised I wasn’t interested in that. At first, my family had a restaurant called Coffee House on Hysan Avenue and it was popular for western style pastries. Later, in 1971, we opened Red Pepper. Back then, there were not a lot of Sichuanese restaurants in Hong Kong. I would finish work in Central and then come back every night to help my dad. In those days, young people didn’t really have their own lives in the same way they do now and so I spent a lot of time in the family business. Our clients are quite international, even from the start. There were locally based British people and fewer Cantonese. Then later in the 70s and 80s, there were more Japanese – their economy was doing very well and there were a lot of Japanese department stores in Causeway Bay. It gets very full during rugby season every year and people would book multiple tables. People used to get quite rowdy, taking off their clothes and jumping around. We get international press and customers have shown us that we were mentioned in The New York Times. Bruce Lee fans know that Game of Death was filmed here and so we get asked about that. I wasn’t there during filming but my brother was to make sure that the film crew were taken care of over those few days.”

More Stories

Causeway Bay: Then & Now


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Causeway Bay embodies the many facets of Hong Kong – the fast pace, fascinating contrasts and dynamic energy. From the city’s very beginning to the present day, its diversity and vibrancy makes it a beloved neighbourhood.

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    506 Lockhart Road

    Ask anyone in Hong Kong where to get the best steamed milk pudding, and they will likely point you towards Yee Shun Dairy Company.

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    Founder, Arts and Culture Outreach

    Long before there was Art Basel Hong Kong, long before international galleries opened their doors and jet-setting collectors began coming here…

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  • Irene Lee


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    There are very few people who know the origin of a suburb, let alone one as integral to Hong Kong as Causeway Bay. But for Irene Lee, granddaughter of Lee Hysan and current chairman of Hysan Development, she can look back on the neighbourhood’s inception…

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  • Michell Lie


    Brand manager, ink artist & candle maker

    “In my eyes, Causeway Bay is a cultural gem. I spent my entire secondary school life here, living next to Victoria Park…

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  • Zoroastrian Prayer Hall in Causeway Bay


    Neville Shroff, President, and Ervad Homyar Nasirabadwala, Priest of The Incorporated Trustees of the Zoroastrian Charity Funds of Hong Kong, Canton & Macao

    Zoroastrianism is known as the oldest practiced religion in the world: originating in ancient Persia over three thousand years ago…

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  • Candy Cheung


    Shun Kee Typhoon Shelter Seafood Owner

    “We grew up here on the water. In the 1950s and 1960s, the Causeway Bay typhoon shelter used to be filled with these floating restaurants, but by the 90s, they’d begun to disappear. Some of the few that remained eventually shut down and opened up on-land instead…

    Streetsnaps
  • Grace Lam


    Fashion stylist

    Causeway Bay has always been part of life for Grace Lam. Growing up in Hong Kong, she attended St. Paul’s Convent School for kindergarten…

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  • Yau Lee Bean Sauce


    1A Canal Road East

    Nestled in the bustling Canal Street, Yau Lee Bean Sauce has been a top purveyor of fu yu (fermented bean curd) in Hong Kong for nearly 60 years.

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Celebrating Causeway Bay


Feature

A neighbourhood in flux, Causeway Bay’s constant evolution keeps residents and visitors coming back for more. Whether it’s fashion, food, film or art, it’s a part of Hong Kong that keeps people mesmerised and inspired.

Causeway Bay: Then & Now


Feature

Causeway Bay embodies the many facets of Hong Kong – the fast pace, fascinating contrasts and dynamic energy. From the city’s very beginning to the present day, its diversity and vibrancy makes it a beloved neighbourhood.

  • Zoroastrian Prayer Hall in Causeway Bay


    Neville Shroff, President, and Ervad Homyar Nasirabadwala, Priest of The Incorporated Trustees of the Zoroastrian Charity Funds of Hong Kong, Canton & Macao

    Zoroastrianism is known as the oldest practiced religion in the world: originating in ancient Persia over three thousand years ago…

    Interviews
  • Candy Cheung


    Shun Kee Typhoon Shelter Seafood Owner

    “We grew up here on the water. In the 1950s and 1960s, the Causeway Bay typhoon shelter used to be filled with these floating restaurants, but by the 90s, they’d begun to disappear. Some of the few that remained eventually shut down and opened up on-land instead…

    Streetsnaps
  • Grace Lam


    Fashion stylist

    Causeway Bay has always been part of life for Grace Lam. Growing up in Hong Kong, she attended St. Paul’s Convent School for kindergarten…

    Interviews
  • Yau Lee Bean Sauce


    1A Canal Road East

    Nestled in the bustling Canal Street, Yau Lee Bean Sauce has been a top purveyor of fu yu (fermented bean curd) in Hong Kong for nearly 60 years.

    Streetsnaps