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Jimmy Lee


Owner, Red Pepper

“In 1967, I worked as an apprentice at an architecture office by day and then went to night school. I worked on the first floor of the Lee Garden building when there were a lot of government offices but after three years, realised I wasn’t interested in that. At first, my family had a restaurant called Coffee House on Hysan Avenue and it was popular for western style pastries. Later, in 1971, we opened Red Pepper. Back then, there were not a lot of Sichuanese restaurants in Hong Kong. I would finish work in Central and then come back every night to help my dad. In those days, young people didn’t really have their own lives in the same way they do now and so I spent a lot of time in the family business. Our clients are quite international, even from the start. There were locally based British people and fewer Cantonese. Then later in the 70s and 80s, there were more Japanese – their economy was doing very well and there were a lot of Japanese department stores in Causeway Bay. It gets very full during rugby season every year and people would book multiple tables. People used to get quite rowdy, taking off their clothes and jumping around. We get international press and customers have shown us that we were mentioned in The New York Times. Bruce Lee fans know that Game of Death was filmed here and so we get asked about that. I wasn’t there during filming but my brother was to make sure that the film crew were taken care of over those few days.”

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A neighbourhood in flux, Causeway Bay’s constant evolution keeps residents and visitors coming back for more. Whether it’s fashion, food, film or art, it’s a part of Hong Kong that keeps people mesmerised and inspired.

Causeway Bay: Then & Now


Feature

Causeway Bay embodies the many facets of Hong Kong – the fast pace, fascinating contrasts and dynamic energy. From the city’s very beginning to the present day, its diversity and vibrancy makes it a beloved neighbourhood.

  • Savin Kwok


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    “My dad operated Tak Shing Tea Stall from 1972 to 2003. It was two carts in an alley between Lan Fong and Pak Sha Roads that sold milk tea, coffee, beef ball and…

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  • Christine Tsoi


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    “As a child, I would walk along this street on my way to school. I didn’t know then that decades later, I would still be passing by these same pigeons…

    Streetsnaps
  • The Lee Gardens Hotel


    Joseph Yung, former General Manager and Toh Toh Ma, former Chief Executive

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    Owner, Jardine Bazaar stall

    “I’ve been here for 47 years. I love the women who like my stall. They bring their relatives and friends to visit and I’ve watched them grow from young women…

    Streetsnaps